Category Archives: Car Maintenance

6 New Year’s Resolutions for Your Car | Annual Car Maintenance

new year's resolutions for the car - annual car maintenance

It’s the beginning of the new year — a time for fresh starts and new projects. People are planning their New Year’s Resolutions from spending more time with family to joining the local gym. We all have ways in which we want to improve our lives in the upcoming year. As we look to better our lives and those around us, there is one thing that we often take for granted and may not be thinking about — our vehicle.

Our cars are a part of our family; trusty and true for years on end as we drive to school, work, vacation, soccer fields, and countless trips to shopping centers and grocery stores. Unfortunately, they need a lot of maintenance to run smoothly. If your car made it through a tumultuous 2016, here are some important annual car maintenance tasks to think about for 2017.

6 Car Resolutions for the New Year

As you sit down to come up with your own personal resolutions, we offer 6 New Year’s Resolutions for your vehicle below. We want your life’s path to be smooth in 2017. A car owner with a smooth ride will provide just that.

1. Check and Change Your Oil

Part of maintaining a healthy vehicle is making sure it is properly lubricated. Get routine oil changes (or change your oil yourself) and check oil levels frequently (every month). Changing oil regularly is vital; otherwise you’re risking permanent damage to your vehicle.

Make 2017 the year you make the habit of checking your oil level frequently. While some people may recommend checking your oil every time you refill the gas tank, once a month will do the trick. Set a reminder on your phone so you never forget this important car maintenance task.

If you’re not sure what it means to “regularly maintain” your vehicle’s oil level, check your owner’s manual. Typically, you should change your oil levels every 5,000 miles or so, but you want to check the level much more frequently. If you don’t remember the last time you had your oil changed, it’s time to learn how to change your oil and filter. You can also bring the car in to a mechanic and they will do it for around $50-$100.

Checking your oil level, however, is much easier and only takes a few minutes.

Materials: paper towel or rag and sufficient light

Steps:

  1. After the engine has turned off, wait at least 5 minutes.
  2. Make sure you are on a level surface.
  3. Look for your car’s oil dipstick undernearth the hood of the car. It usually says oil or displays an oil can icon.
  4. Pull out the dipstick and wipe it clean with a rag or paper towel.
  5. Put the dipstick all the way back in.
  6. Pull the dipstick back out and inspect it without turning it upside down. You should have two markers (lines or holes) near the bottom of the dipstick. If the oily part ends below the bottom marker, you need more oil. Never add more than a quart of oil at a time before rechecking the oil level. Too much motor oil is bad for the vehicle. If the oil level is between the two markers, you are good to go.

Congratulations, you learned a new life skill. Easy, wasn’t it?

2. Learn How to Change a Tire

Every car owner should make the resolution to learn how to change his or her own vehicle’s tire. Sure, calling roadside assistance is great, but what if you don’t have AAA, cell service, or your membership expired? There might always come a time when you need to know this important skill.

Ask family members to join you for the lesson, especially if you have a new driver in the family. Together you will all enter 2017 with a new skill and a safer ride.

Materials: lug wrench, spare tire, and car jack.

Steps:

  1. Make sure your car is in a safe area, on a flat surface.
  2. Remove the hubcap and get the spare tire out.
  3. Loosen the lug nuts with a lug wrench (just a little bit). Use the star pattern as indicated in the illustrated guide below.
  4. Reference your owner’s manual for the correct location to place the jack.
  5. Raise the jack and make sure it has securely contacted the car’s frame.
  6. Crank up the jack until the wheel is high enough to remove the tire.
  7. Use the lug wrench to remove the lug nuts (you may be able to do this by hand). Make sure the lug nuts are in a secure place.
  8. Remove the flat tire and place it flat on the ground.
  9. Line up the spare tire with the wheel studs and put the lug nuts back into place with your hand. When you can’t turn the nuts or bolts any further, lower the jack until the wheel is on the ground.
  10. Finish tightening the lug nuts with your wrench using the star pattern below.
  11. Remember, a spare tire is only a temporary fix and should never be driven at high speeds. Get your tire repaired or replaced as soon as possible!

Use this illustrated guide from the Art of Manliness and the following video from AAA for a visual demonstration:

how to change a flat tire

For wheels with 5 lug nuts, use this pattern:

lug nut tightening star pattern changing flat tire

If you just have 4 nuts, use this one:

lug nut tightening pattern change flat tire

Source: Art of Manliness

3. Take Care of Your Tires

It is very obvious when you have a flat tire. But it could be less obvious when your tires are low, worn, or ready to be replaced. When your tire is underinflated, your gas mileage goes down and your risk for a flat goes up. When the tire is overinflated, you run the risk of a dangerous blow-out. It’s time to use your tire gauge and find out how much air you need to put back in.

Stick-type tire gauges are the most unreliable so we recommend spending a little bit more for a digital or dial-type gauge. You can get these at your local auto-parts store or online. Refer to your owner’s manual for the proper tire pressure. This is usually between 30 and 35 PSI.

Gas stations as well as local tire stores will usually fill up your tires for free. All you to do is take the time to notice.

Here are some signs that your tires need to be replaced:

  1. If the tread depth is lower than 1/16 inch (1.6 millimeters), they are considered to be “legally” worn out.
  2. Use a tread depth indicator purchased from your auto-parts store or online.
  3. Use the penny test. Take a penny and insert the top part of Lincoln’s head (head down) into one of the tire treads. If you can see his entire head, it’s time to replace your tire immediately. If only a small part of his head is cut off, consider a replacement soon. If his entire forehead is covered, you’re good to go. Use the penny test on a few areas of each tire to get a more accurate reading.

how to tell if you need to replace car tires - penny test

Source: bridgestonetire.com

If there is uneven wear on your tires, it may be time for a tire rotation, wheel alignment, or both. This is when you should probably have your car serviced by a professional.

In addition to making sure your tires are safe and inflated properly, you want to remember to rotate your tires every 5,000-10,000 miles or so (check your owner’s manual for a more accurate rotation schedule). Since your tires wear unevenly, rotating your tires can help ensure a longer lifespan for each tire. Regular tire rotations also provide a smoother and safer ride. While it is possible to rotate your tires yourself, it may be easier to ask your mechanic to do it for you.

4. Drive Safely

Do NOT text while driving! This is extremely careless. If you must use your phone on the road, use a hands-free device and don’t take any calls during hazardous driving conditions. Don’t write down notes or look up things on your phone while driving. If you must place a call, do so at a red light, stop sign, or parking space.

Deaths from car accidents are often the most preventable – remember how important it is to all parties on the road to stay vigilant and focused. Everyone wants to get home safely. Vow to drive safer this New Year.

Learn safe winter driving tips here.

5. Learn How to Jump-Start a Vehicle

Are you the person who sees someone stranded on the side of the road and drives by hoping that a more capable person with the correct tools can come to the rescue? Even though jumpstarting a dead battery is very easy to do, too many people rely on AAA or a generous driver to come to the rescue.

Everybody should know how to jumpstart a dead battery. Not only can you save your own hide, but you can also come to the rescue for someone else.

To prevent being stranded on the side of the road or looking a fool when someone asks for your help, a good car resolution is to learn how to jumpstart a car.

Be extra careful and make sure the jumper cables are connected to the right areas! There is a risk of electrocution. Red = positive. Black = negative.

Use this illustrated guide and video from the Art of Manliness for a visual demonstration:

how to jumpstart a car illustrated guide

6. Check Fluids & Follow Maintenance Schedule

Professional maintenance is necessary to keep your car running properly all year. This includes fluid checks and changes, tire rotations, and general inspections.

Check your owner’s manual for a recommended maintenance schedule. If you lost yours, Google it.

By regularly checking your car’s fluid levels and replacing them as necessary, you can ward off most car repairs.

Motor Oil: check monthly.

Transmission Fluid: check monthly.

Coolant (Antifreeze): check twice a year.

Brake Fluid: check every time you change your oil.

Power Steering Fluid: check monthly.

Windshield Wiper Fluid: check monthly.

Set calendar reminders on your phone and make notes of levels. Replacement schedules vary by car, so double check your owner’s manual rather than relying on what your mechanic has to say.

As an added resolution to the New Year, once you’ve mastered the mechanical and essential, attempting to keep your car clean is the cherry on top. Don’t use your car as a trashcan and keep your car clean from salt, grease, grime, acid rain, sap, dead bugs, and other things that can eat away at your paint and damage your vehicle. This will help you a lot if you ever decide to sell your car.

If you’re looking to buy or sell a used car, come on over to Auto Simple!

Happy New Year!


Auto Simple wants you to find a car you love at a price you can afford. We carry a large selection of hand-picked, Certified Pre-Owned vehicles, all of which come with a 6 month/6,000-mile powertrain warranty.

With locations in Cleveland, Chattanooga, Dayton, and a new store in Dalton, GA, we make it easy to walk away with your dream car.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to speak with one of our Online Specialists or give us a call:

Chattanooga, TN – (423) 551-3600

Cleveland, TN – (423) 476-4600

Dayton, TN – (423) 775-4600

Dalton, GA – (706) 217-2277

Follow us on social media for more useful information on buying, selling, and maintaining cars: FacebookTwitterYoutube, and Google+.

10 Ways to Winterize Your Car | Get Your Vehicle Ready for Winter

How to Winterize Your Vehicle

Winter weather can take its toll on your vehicle, especially if you have an older model. With rock salt, ice, hail, and freezing temperatures, it’s important to take the necessary steps to prevent winter damage, maintain your vehicle, and be prepared in the case of an emergency.

10 Ways to Winterize Your Vehicle

1. Battery

People often worry about their car’s engine during the winter months, but forget that their battery will also be struggling to perform. In colder temperatures, the power of your battery is greatly reduced—sometimes by as much as 50%!

Before the dreariest days of winter hit, make sure your battery can withstand the cold:

  • Get your battery load-tested by a mechanic. This checks your battery’s ability to hold a charge. As a general rule, if your battery is over 5 years old, consider replacing it before any extensive winter road trip.
  • If your battery is 3 years old or older, have your battery checked annually and replace it if it’s low.
  • Inspect your battery to make sure all cables, terminals, and connections are clean and free of damage and corrosion.

2. Tire Pressure

jeep driving in winter with snow tires

Source: pixabay

Did you know that for every 10°-drop in temperature, you lose 1 pound of pressure?

As the weather gets colder, the likelihood that your tires will lose pressure or become worn and slip on slick roads increases. You don’t want to be stuck on the side with a flat tire in the middle of winter. Before you head out in the cold, check your tire pressure.

How to Check Tire Pressure:

Although a lot of people think that the recommended tire pressure can be found on the tires. This is actually the wrong place to look. The pressure amount on the tire is normally the maximum allowed pressure. You should almost always have less pressure than what’s listed on the tire.

Check your owner’s manual or the inside of one of the door posts, most often in the driver side door. Once you know the correct tire pressure, pick up a tire gauge if you don’t already have one handy in the glove box. The pencil-style tire gauges are notoriously unreliable so we recommend an analog or digital type.

After you fill up all of your tires to the recommended pressure, put air in your spare tire as well and double-check that you have all the necessary equipment to do a quick and safe tire change. Another option to consider is snow tires.

These are essential for certain areas of the United States that experience a lot of snow. Consider switching out your regular tires with snow tires for better traction and flexibility. Specialized seasonal tires offer you the protection you need when cruising through the snow.

snow tires driving through snow

Source: Consumer Reports

3. Wiper Blades

There is nothing scarier than not being able to see the road when you are driving! The weather is much more volatile in the colder months. Drivers face a variety of weather hazards — from sleet and snow, to rain and ice. Without efficient and high-functioning wiper blades, driving becomes even more dangerous.

It is recommended that wiper blades be changed every other year. Consider getting winter-specific wiper blades to help you see through the coming snow storms. If you have a hunch your current blades won’t hold up, have them replaced before winter arrives.

man adding windshield wiper fluid to car - how to winterize vehicle

Source: hunterinsuranceagency.blogspot.com

4. Wiper Fluid

In the winter, you’ll need to switch to freeze-resistant wiper fluid. Again, keeping your vision clear, even in the worst weather, is a safety measure that shouldn’t be overlooked.

Keep extra wiper fluid in the car.

5. Motor Oil

refilling motor oil as part of oil change

Source: wikimedia.org

If you live in an area where the temperature will dip below freezing, it is recommended to replace your oil with a thinner, lower viscosity. This is because cold weather causes oil to thicken. Your owner’s manual is the best place to check for compatible oil solutions. Winter or not, be sure to change your oil every 3,000–5,000 miles, or approximately every three-to-five months.

Learn How to Change Your Motor Oil (and Filter)

6. Coolant

Fluids can freeze in your radiator without the correct antifreeze and water mixture. It is suggested that there be a 50/50 balance. Adjustments need to be made depending on how cold your area gets.

If you will be expecting weather below 32 degrees, then 70/30 would be more appropriate. Antifreeze protects your engine and fights corrosion. Most likely this important step will be simple to check off your list. You can purchase pre-mixed solutions at your local gas station.

If you’re unsure of the composition of your radiator’s fluid, purchase an anti-freeze tester at your local car shop or hardware store.

7. System Checks

Inspect your headlights, taillights, turn signals, rear-window defrosters, heating system, seat belts, and electronics. If there are any burnt out bulbs or broken parts, get it fixed before you get in an accident. You may want to consider replacing bulbs if they are dim.

You will also want to inspect your belts and hoses for wear and tear. Cold weather can cause on of your belts to snap, leaving you stranded on the road. If you notice any signs of damage, have them replaced.

8. Four-Wheel & All-Wheel Drive

Reacquaint yourself with your Four-Wheel Drive or All-Wheel Drive systems. If you haven’t busted out the 4WD or AWD in awhile, winter is the time to put it to use. SUVs are much better equipped to handle severe weather with these systems in place. Both 4WD and AWD are used to improve traction and combat slippery conditions. They aren’t so popular to use in the summer, so you could find yourself rusty on how it works.

Your owner’s manual will have information on the environments meant for 4WD to be activated. In terms of AWD, this will be automatically engaged if your car finds itself losing traction. It then goes to work, supplying power to and stabilizing the tires that need assistance.

Consider taking a winter driving course to get familiar with poor weather conditions, especially if you are a new driver. Winter driving techniques are sometimes counter-intuitive and require practice. Learn now so you can save yourself later.

9. Tune Up Your Vehicle 

Routine vehicle maintenance is important year-round, but especially before the winter months. Weather has a huge impact on the functionality of your vehicle, and servicing your vehicle becomes more pertinent during this colder time of the year. Your mechanic should take a look at your vehicle, performing a sort of all around physical. All above points (battery, fluids, tires, wipers) should be checked, as well as belts, hoses, and spark plugs. Belt and hoses need to be examined for any noticeable wear and tear.

10. Prepare for Anything: Safety Kit Essentials

FEMA American Red Cross Emergency Safety Kit - car winterization tips

Source: fema.gov

Life is unpredictable. That’s why packing an emergency safety kit that stays in your car is the perfect way to be prepared for anything. Think of your winter road trips in the same way you would a camping trip, and prepare accordingly. There are many things that could go wrong. Things usually don’t, but you’ll feel protected knowing you can tackle most any bump in the road and trek through the icy trails.

Vehicle Emergency Items:

  • Jumper Cables
  • Tool Kit
  • Tire Chains
  • Tire Gauge
  • Tire-Changing Essentials – jack, lug wrench, spare tire
  • Blanket, Leather Driving Gloves, Snow Cap or Beanie
  • Cleaning Towel & Paper Towels
  • Snack Foods & Water Bottles
  • Flashlight
  • First Aid Kit
  • Extra Coolant
  • Deicing fluid (glycerine)

We recommend keeping your gas tank close to full so that you can use the car engine for warmth if you are waiting for help on the side of the road.

Watch this video for more tips on How to Winterize Your Car:

Did we miss anything? Share your car winterization tips with us.


Auto Simple wants you to find a car you love at a price you can afford. We carry a large selection of hand-picked, Certified Pre-Owned vehicles, all with a 6 month/6,000-mile Powertrain Warranty.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to speak with one of our Online Specialists or give us a call:

Chattanooga, TN – (423) 551-3600

Cleveland, TN – (423) 476-4600

Dayton, TN – (423) 775-4600

Dalton, GA – (706) 217-CARS (2277)

Follow us on social media for more useful information on buying, selling, and maintaining cars: FacebookTwitterYoutube, and Google+. 

How to Change Your Motor Oil (and Filter)

motor oil container - How to Change Your Oil and Filter

How much do you pay for a motor oil change? $95? $45? Even if you have a Groupon to Jiffy Lube, it’s cheaper to change the oil yourself. But if frugality doesn’t convince you, perhaps a rejuvenated sense of pride and self-confidence will. Besides, everyone thinks working on a car is sexy.

When should I change my motor oil? 

Although you’ve probably heard the recommendation to change your oil every 3,000 or 5,000 miles, newer cars and oils can handle longer distances. Changing your motor oil too frequently is bad for the environment and your wallet. For the most accurate advice, always check your owner’s manual for the mileage intervals between oil changes.

Neglecting regular oil changes can permanently damage your engine.

How to Change Your Motor Oil (and Filter)

Time:

If you have all the materials on hand, you can change your motor oil and oil filter in under 30 minutes.

Materials:

  1. Motor Oil

First, you need to make sure you have the proper oil for your engine. Unfortunately, as in many cases, we have a case of choice overload—synthetic, synthetic-blend, conventional, premium conventional, high-mileage, heavy duty—you see what I mean!

As with mileage intervals between oil changes, consult your owner’s manual for the correct weight/viscosity of the oil and how many quarts you need, sometimes listed under the heading, “capacities.” Usually, it is around 4–6 liters (1.1–1.6 gallons).

No matter what type of oil you choose, always follow manufacturer instructions.

  1. Oil Filter

Whenever you change the oil, you’ll also want to change the filter. Different cars require different oil filters, so again, consult your user’s manual.

You can also show up to the auto parts store with the year, make, and model of your car, and they should be able to look it up for you.

  1. Socket Wrench

You will need a 6 point socket wrench to loosen the drain plug. If you have a socket wrench kit, you should already have the right-sized wrench for the job (Japanese and European cars usually require a metric set). If not, you can find the right-sized attachment for under $5.

  1. Oil Filter Wrench or Pliers 

You might need an oil filter wrench or oil filter pliers to remove the old oil filter, which will set you back around $5-$10. Make sure you buy the right size. If you’re lucky, however, you might be able to remove the filter by hand.

  1. Car Jack or Car Ramp

Use a car jack (with jack stands) or a car ramp to get your car off the ground.

  1. Drain Pan, Funnel, and Plastic Jug

You need three things to properly dispose of the old oil: a pan or bucket to catch the oil, and a funnel and old plastic milk jug to transport it. Improper disposal of motor oil is illegal.

  1. Old Rags, Disposable Gloves, and Safety Glasses

Motor oil has toxic contaminants that you want to keep away from your skin, eyes, and mouth. Wear safety glasses and use disposable nitrile gloves and rags to wipe off any excess oil.

Step-by-Step Instructions

1. Drain Motor Oil:

  • Warm up the car

In order to facilitate oil flow, make sure the engine is warm by taking the vehicle for a spin around the block or by letting it idle for 5-10 minutes. Once the engine is warm, find yourself a flat surface to work on.

WARNING: To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, never let your car idle in a garage or other enclosed area.

  • Park on flat surface and jack up vehicle

hydraulic car jack and jack stand - added car safety

Source: Howard Klaaste/Bigstock.com

Make sure the car is on a flat surface, put the car in park, apply the parking break, and remove the keys. Look up your car’s jacking points in the owner’s manual and jack up the engine side of the vehicle.

If you are using a jack, support the vehicle with jack stands! We also recommend restraining rear tires with wheel blocks to prevent the back wheels from rolling.

If you are using a ramp, drive up it front wheels first, but be careful not to overshoot. Once safely on the ramp, engage the parking break and turn the engine off.

WARNING: Always follow safety instructions for the proper use of ramps and car jacks.

  • Remove the oil dipstick

cleaning motor oil dipstick - how to change motor oil

Source: vladacanon/Bigstock.com

Now that the car is securely lifted, put on your gloves and pop the hood. Remove the oil dipstick, which will allow the oil to drain smoother and faster. If you can’t find your oil dipstick, consult the owner’s manual.

  • Locate the oil pan and oil plug

Next, you’ll need to get underneath your car to find the oil pan, which looks like a flat metal pan underneath to the engine, further away from the transmission.

The oil plug looks like a large bolt on the bottom of the oil pan. If you are having difficulty locating the oil pan, consult your owner’s manual.

  • Place a drain pan or large bucket underneath the oil pan

The container you choose should be large enough to hold all the old oil that will soon be draining out. Most cars hold about 4-5 quarts of oil, so make sure the container can safely catch at least that amount. We also recommend laying out some newspaper to prevent oil stains.

  • Remove the oil plug

oil draining out of motor oil drain pan - how to change oil (and filter)

Source: Dvortygirl/Wikimedia Commons

Before you drain the motor oil, make sure you have your gloves and safety glasses on. Once you find the oil plug bolt at the bottom of the pan, start loosening it with the proper sized socket wrench (some vehicles may have two drain plugs).

When the bolt head is loose, use your gloved hands to remove the plug very slowly, so that the oil drips into the bucket/pan below.

Oil will flow quickly at first, but will it will take up to 30 minutes for all the oil to drain out.

WARNING: Oil may be very hot!

  • Replace the plug and add a new washer

When the oil has stopped dripping, clean up any excess oil and wipe the drain plug and plug threads with a rag.

After inspecting the condition of your drain plug and gasket, replace the plug and add a new drain plug gasket if necessary.

If your plug and washer are still in good condition, reinstall the plug and tighten it as far as you can with your hand. Then use a 6-pt. socket wrench to secure it, while being careful not to over-tighten it.

2. Replace Oil Filter:

  • Locate and remove oil filter

removing oil filter with socket wrench

Source: Dvortygirl/Wikimedia Commons

Unfortunately, there isn’t a standard location for oil filters, so you may have to spend some time locating it. This may be the hardest part! If you are having any difficulty, consult the owner’s manual.

The old oil filter will have some oil inside, so make sure a pan or bucket is underneath to catch any excess oil. You may need a socket-type oil filter wrench to remove the old filter, however, many can be removed by hand.

Once the filter is removed and the excess oil has drained, use a rag to clean the area and check for any loose gaskets or debris that may be stuck inside the mounting plate.

  • Lubricate new filter with oil and screw into place

Use your glove-covered finger to spread a little oil over the gasket of your new filter and thread it into the opening where the filter goes. You should be able to tighten it by hand.

Oil filters come with specific instructions for how many rotations you need to tighten it (located on the packaging or the filter itself). When in doubt, see owner’s manual for instructions.

3. Add Clean Oil and Recycle Oil & Filter:

  • Refill new oil

After the drain plug is replaced and the new filter installed, use a clean funnel to fill your car with new oil. Consult your owner’s manual to find out the correct viscosity and volume you should pour in, but most cars take 4–6 liters. Once you have replaced the oil, screw the oil cap back on.

For the most accurate oil level readings, check your dipstick first thing in the morning, when the car is cool and on a level surface.

  • Run the car and inspect for leaks

You’re almost done! After pouring in the correct amount of new oil, close the hood, return the dipstick, run the engine, and look under the car for any oil leaks or spills (especially near the oil pan and filter). If you see a leak, cut the engine and let it cool before repairing the leak.

Once you have checked for leaks, turn the engine off and wait one minute before lowering the vehicle to the ground.

  • Clean up and write down the date and mileage of the car.

Look around and clean up any oil, newspaper, or rags. Write down the date of your oil change and mileage of your vehicle and leave it in the car for future reference. Follow the owner’s manual for the proper mileage in between oil changes.

WARNING: Change your oil on a regular basis to avoid permanent damage to your vehicle.

  • Return oil dipstick and properly dispose of old oil and oil filter

It is a crime to throw your old oil and filter away in the sewer or trash. In order to abide by local and federal laws, you need to recycle your old oil at a local gas station, auto shop, or recycling center. Just transport your oil, using a funnel, into a couple of empty milk jugs and take them to a recycling center near you.

WARNING: Be careful not to contaminate the recycling process by using empty paint cans, bleach containers, or anything else that used to contain chemicals. Make sure you call the recycling center first for days and hours of operation.

That’s it! Now grab a cold one and congratulate yourself for saving money and learning a new skill.

Auto Simple Offers FREE Oil Changes!

Become a Preferred Customer of Auto Simple simply by signing up for recurring payments from your checking account via ACH or debit card and earn FREE oil changes every 90 days for the life of your loan!*

If you have any questions about how to change your oil or filter, don’t hesitate to give us a call at 423-584-6700.

Image Sources: Bigstock and Wikimedia Commons


Auto Simple wants you to find a car you love at a price you can afford. We carry a large selection of hand-picked, Certified Pre-Owned vehicles, all of which come with a 6 month/6,000-mile powertrain warranty.

With locations in Cleveland, Chattanooga, Dayton, and a new store in Dalton, GA, we make it easy to walk away with your dream car. We specialize in financing for all credit levels, low down payments, and affordable weekly payments. In most cases we can have you driving your new car in less than an hour.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to speak with one of our Online Specialists or give us a call:

Chattanooga, TN – (423) 551-3600

Cleveland, TN – (423) 476-4600

Dayton, TN – (423) 775-4600

Dalton, GA – (706) 217-CARS (2277)

Follow us on social media for more useful information on buying, selling, and maintaining cars: Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, and Google+.

*Preferred Customer program and free conventional oil changes every ninety (90) days are contingent upon the customer electing to make recurring payments to via ACH or debit card. Additionally, to continue in the Preferred Customer program and receive free oil changes, the customer’s loan must remain in good standing, and the customer may not cancel the recurring payment election. See store for further details. Other restrictions may apply.